SBA Offers Disaster Assistance to Residents of North Carolina Affected by Tornado and Severe Storms

SBA Administrator Linda McMahon issued the following statement after the announcement of the Presidential disaster declaration for several counties in North Carolina affected by a tornado and severe storms on April 15, 2018:

“The U.S. Small Business Administration is strongly committed to providing North Carolina residents with the most effective response possible to assist businesses, homeowners and renters with federal disaster loans. Getting businesses and communities up and running after a disaster is our highest priority.”
The disaster declaration covers Guilford and Rockingham counties in North Carolina which are eligible for both Physical and Economic Injury Disaster Loans from the SBA.  Small businesses and most private nonprofit organizations in the following adjacent counties are eligible to apply only for SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loans: Alamance, Caswell, Davidson, Forsyth, Randolph and Stokes in North Carolina; and Henry and Pittsylvania in Virginia.
Businesses and private nonprofit organizations of any size may borrow up to $2 million to repair or replace disaster damaged or destroyed real estate, machinery and equipment, inventory, and other business assets.  Applicants may be eligible for a loan amount increase up to 20 percent of their physical damages, as verified by the SBA for mitigation purposes.  Eligible mitigation improvements may include a safe room or storm shelter to help protect property and occupants from future damage caused by a similar disaster.
For small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small businesses engaged in aquaculture and most private nonprofit organizations, the SBA offers Economic Injury Disaster Loans to help meet working capital needs caused by the disaster.  Economic Injury Disaster Loan assistance is available regardless of whether the business suffered any physical property damage.
Disaster loans up to $200,000 are available to homeowners to repair or replace disaster damaged or destroyed real estate.  Homeowners and renters are eligible up to $40,000 to repair or replace disaster damaged or destroyed personal property.
Interest rates are as low as 3.58 percent for businesses, 2.5 percent for nonprofit organizations and 1.813 percent for homeowners and renters with terms up to 30 years.  Loan amounts and terms are set by the SBA and are based on each applicant’s financial condition.
Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via the SBA’s secure website at DisasterLoan.sba.gov.
To be considered for all forms of disaster assistance, applicants should register online at DisasterAssistance.gov or download the FEMA mobile app. If online or mobile access is unavailable, applicants should call the FEMA toll-free helpline at 800-621-3362. Those who use 711-Relay or Video Relay Services should call 800-621-3362.
Additional details on the locations of Disaster Recovery Centers and the loan application process can be obtained by calling the SBA Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955 (800-877-8339 for the deaf and hard-of-hearing) or by sending an e-mail to disastercustomerservice@sba.gov (link sends e-mail).
The filing deadline to return applications for physical property damage is July 9, 2018.  The deadline to return economic injury applications is Feb. 8, 2019.

Elevated Environmental’s President Named One of Triad’s Outstanding Women in Business

Stephanie Cox, Elevated Environmental Corp. Selected as One of Triad Business Journal’s Outstanding Women in Business

Name: Stephanie Cox

Company/title: Elevated Environmental Corp., president

Business address: 1001 NE Market St., Suite B, Reidsville, 27320

Phone: 336-645-5049

Email: stephanie@elevatedenvironmental.com

Twitter: @elevatedenviro


From: Buckhannon, West Virginia

Education: Associate’s, science-surgical technology, American National University

Family: Spouse, Justin; son, Caleb


Why selected: A mentor, teacher, colleague and leader, Stephanie Cox has constantly worked on developing the brand from day one for a woman-owned company that manages environmental, demolition, remediation and industrial services. While hiring about 15 full-time employees and several part-time and temporary employees, Cox has worked to certify the company as a minority-owned business. She has directed a five-person sales force to $2 million in sales while simultaneously bolstering sales in smaller markets from zero to $240,000. She chairs the board of the Gate City Community Foundation, which provides soccer opportunities in underserved areas, is working on a partnership to develop a soccer program in Lomé, Togo, and has led Elevated Environmental to earn the Outstanding Corporate Citizen Award from the Reidsville Chamber of Commerce.


A time when someone empowered me and how I grew through that experience: During my surgical internship in college, I had the opportunity to work with some of the top surgeons in the nation. This time empowered me as I gained hands-on experience saving lives as part of the trauma team.

A time when I empowered someone else and how that yielded additional benefits: In hiring a chaplain for my company, I empowered a young man to minister and encourage employees. Providing this guidance and counseling has improved morale and productivity along with establishing a positive work environment.

A lesson learned from a mentor: Delegate tasks and responsibilities.

Advice for women just starting their careers: Faith, family and then career. Surround yourself with people who inspire, motivate and encourage you. And, enjoy yourself — always.

A woman I admire: Mother Teresa: She dedicated her life to helping others.

Three adjectives that describe me: Dedicated, enthusiastic, caring.

Most impactful volunteer activity: North Carolina Baptist Men & Women Disaster Relief.

Something about me that would surprise people: I’m a complete introvert.


Women continue to be vastly underrepresented in boardrooms and C-suites. What is the strongest business case for why that should change? Women bring a different perspective and leadership style to traditional corporate management.


First job as a youth: Babysitter

In hindsight, I wish …: I had taken more business classes.

I aspire still to …: Volunteer on a mission trip abroad.

If I had to choose another career, I would be …: An environmental scientist.

Favorite television show: “Fixer Upper”

Last concert attended: Winter Jam

Name of a song that demonstrates my strength — and makes me want to dance: “Awake & Alive” (Skillet)

Hobbies: Beach, camping, hiking.

Most adventurous thing I’ve ever done: Mount Mitchell in the winter.